AnonymX: The End of the Privacy Era

Opening:

Saturday, 18.02.17, 20:00

Closing:

Saturday, 19.08.17

Curator:

Svetlana Reingold

Accessible

More info:

04-9115997
Map

Share

The new cluster of exhibitions presents eleven new exhibitions, five of them solo exhibitions and six group exhibitions. The exhibitions presents works by seventy Israeli and international artists. The current cluster of exhibitions deals with the vanishing boundary between the public and private spheres, exhibitionism, narcissism and voyeurism, which are some of the hottest topics of the twenty-first century. The exhibitions seeks to explore social perceptions regarding the concept of privacy and the new models produced by the information and communication revolution, from the beginning of the twentieth century to present days. Many of the exhibition's works are engaged with motifs such as the gaze and surveillance, raising challenging ethical questions about the source of the artwork, power and control. 

Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, has claimed that privacy is no longer a "social norm." Over the last decade, our society has progressed toward the incessant publication of intimate information as an inseparable part of our participation in modern life. The ever-increasing use of mobile phones, the internet, and closed-circuit cameras guarantees that we are all simultaneously observed and casted as voyeurs. In the post-9/11 era, we permit our privacy to be invaded in exchange for a seeming sense of security. Security cameras work uninterruptedly; images are distributed online; archives are catalogued and scanned; satellites launch data into powerful computing systems. Unquestionably, we are living in a Big Brother society, with every step we take recorded, photographed, and documented. Those who are not observed do not exist.

New circumstances of perception and observation create new circumstances of representation. This exhibition examines the value of art within the new media's shared cultural sphere. Its first chapter discusses the principle of voyeuristic pleasure and examines the public sphere in which voyeurism has become a tool of social regulation. The second chapter addresses the celebrity phenomenon as a prominent paradigmatic product of today's culture of visibility and admiration. The last chapter focuses on the diverse meanings of the twenty-first century's surveillance society.

 

**On Thursday, March 30th, a museum event will be held in the evening. The entrance to the galleries during regular opening hours will be limited due to rehearsals for the event. 

The new cluster of exhibitions presents eleven new exhibitions, five of them solo exhibitions and six group exhibitions. The exhibitions presents works by seventy Israeli and international artists. The current cluster of exhibitions deals with the vanishing boundary between the public and private spheres, exhibitionism, narcissism and voyeurism, which are some of the hottest topics of the twenty-first century. The exhibitions seeks to explore social perceptions regarding the concept of privacy and the new models produced by the information and communication revolution, from the beginning of the twentieth century to present days. Many of the exhibition's works are engaged with motifs such as the gaze and surveillance, raising challenging ethical questions about the source of the artwork, power and control.

 

Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, has claimed that privacy is no longer a "social norm." Over the last decade, our society has progressed toward the incessant publication of intimate information as an inseparable part of our participation in modern life. The ever-increasing use of mobile phones, the internet, and closed-circuit cameras guarantees that we are all simultaneously observed and casted as voyeurs. In the post-9/11 era, we permit our privacy to be invaded in exchange for a seeming sense of security. Security cameras work uninterruptedly; images are distributed online; archives are catalogued and scanned; satellites launch data into powerful computing systems. Unquestionably, we are living in a Big Brother society, with every step we take recorded, photographed, and documented. Those who are not observed do not exist.

New circumstances of perception and observation create new circumstances of representation. This exhibition examines the value of art within the new media's shared cultural sphere. Its first chapter discusses the principle of voyeuristic pleasure and examines the public sphere in which voyeurism has become a tool of social regulation. The second chapter addresses the celebrity phenomenon as a prominent paradigmatic product of today's culture of visibility and admiration. The last chapter focuses on the diverse meanings of the twenty-first century's surveillance society.

 

For buying Tickets and further information please leave your details

More in Haifa Museums